Gender and the pursuit of small prey: archaeological, historical and iconographic perspectives on trapping, falconry and ferreting

Fowler, Thomas A. (2016) Gender and the pursuit of small prey: archaeological, historical and iconographic perspectives on trapping, falconry and ferreting. MA(Res) thesis, University of Nottingham.

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Abstract

The remains of small animals are seldom recovered in great numbers during archaeological excavation. These taxa are therefore often neglected by zooarchaeologists because species recovered in great quantities are assumed to be the most ‘important’. Zooarchaeological narratives on human interactions with wild fauna are therefore constructed with a bias towards big game hunting and therefore towards adult, most often elite, men whilst other social groups, such as women and children are ignored. This study assesses the potential for research on small wild animals to contribute to human-animal studies, to inform us about the construction of gender identity and to address androcentrism in archaeological research.

Item Type: Thesis (University of Nottingham only) (MA(Res))
Supervisors: Sykes, Naomi
Keywords: zooarchaeology, gender, falconry, ferreting, trapping, snaring, small animals, iconography, history, ethnography
Faculties/Schools: UK Campuses > Faculty of Arts > School of Humanities
Item ID: 38543
Depositing User: Fowler, Thomas
Date Deposited: 16 Feb 2017 12:52
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2017 21:47
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/38543

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