Post-stroke visual impairment: a systematic literature review of types and recovery of visual conditions

Hepworth, Lauren and Rowe, Fiona and Walker, Marion and Rockliffe, Janet and Noonan, Carmel and Howard, Claire and Currie, Jim (2015) Post-stroke visual impairment: a systematic literature review of types and recovery of visual conditions. Ophthalmology Research: An International Journal, 5 (1). pp. 1-43. ISSN 2321-7227

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Abstract

Aim: The aim of this literature review was to determine the reported incidence and prevalence of visual impairment due to stroke for all visual conditions including central vision loss, visual field loss, eye movement problems and visual perception problems. A further aim was to document the reported rate and extent of recovery of visual conditions post stroke.

Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted including all languages and translations obtained. The review covered adult participants (aged 18 years or over) diagnosed with a visual impairment as a direct cause of a stroke. Studies which included mixed populations were included if over 50% of the participants had a diagnosis of stroke. We searched scholarly online resources and hand searched journals and registers of published, unpublished and ongoing trials. Search terms included a variety of MESH terms and alternatives in relation to stroke and visual conditions. The quality of the evidence was assessed using key reporting guidelines, e.g. STROBE, CONSORT.

Results: Sixty-one studies (n=25,672) were included in the review. Overall prevalence of visual impairment early after stroke was estimated at 65%, ranging from 19% to 92%. Visual field loss reports ranged from 5.5% to 57%, ocular motility problems from 22% to 54%, visual inattention from 14% to 82% and reduced central vision reported in up to 70%. Recovery of visual field loss varied between 0% and 72%, with ocular motility between 7% and 92% and visual inattention between 29% and 78%.

Conclusion: The current literature provides a range of estimates for prevalence of visual impairment after stroke. Visual impairment post stroke is a common problem and has significant relevance to the assessment and care these patients receive. Prospective figures regarding incidence remain unknown.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Incidence; prevalence; visual impairment; stroke; recovery; review
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Division of Rehabilitation and Ageing
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.9734/OR/2016/21767
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 31 Oct 2016 11:40
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2016 16:29
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/38081

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