In vitro models of medulloblastoma: choosing the right tool for the job

Ivanov, Delyan P. and Coyle, Beth and Walker, David A. and Grabowska, Anna M. (2016) In vitro models of medulloblastoma: choosing the right tool for the job. Journal of Biotechnology, 236 . pp. 10-25. ISSN 1873-4863

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Abstract

The recently-defined four molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma have required updating of our understanding of in vitro models to include molecular classification and risk stratification features from clinical practice. This review seeks to build a more comprehensive picture of the in vitro systems available for modelling medulloblastoma.

The subtype classification and molecular characterisation for over 40 medulloblastoma cell-lines has been compiled, making it possible to identify the strengths and weaknesses in current model systems. Less than half (18/44) of established medulloblastoma cell-lines have been subgrouped. The majority of the subgrouped cell-lines (11/18) are Group 3 with MYC-amplification. SHH cell-lines are the next most common (4/18), half of which exhibit TP53 mutation. WNT and Group 4 subgroups, accounting for 50% of patients, remain underrepresented with 1 and 2 cell-lines respectively.

In vitro modelling relies not only on incorporating appropriate tumour cells, but also on using systems with the relevant tissue architecture and phenotype as well as normal tissues. Novel ways of improving the clinical relevance of in vitro models are reviewed, focusing on 3D cell culture, extracellular matrix, co-cultures with normal cells and organotypic slices. This paper champions the establishment of a collaborative online-database and linked cell-bank to catalyse preclinical medulloblastoma research.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: brain tumor children; cell line molecular subgroups; WNT SHH Group 3 Group 4; three-dimensional cell culture; neurotoxicity testing; normal brain co-culture
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
University of Nottingham, UK > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiotec.2016.07.028
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 22 Aug 2016 07:30
Last Modified: 04 Nov 2016 15:52
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/35789

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