Deficits in object-in-place but not relative recency performance in the APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: implications for object recognition

Bonardi, Charlotte and Pardon, Marie-Christine and Armstrong, Paul (2016) Deficits in object-in-place but not relative recency performance in the APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: implications for object recognition. Behavioural Brain Research, 313 . pp. 71-81. ISSN 1872-7549

[img] PDF - Repository staff only until 7 July 2017. - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Available under Licence Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.
Download (1MB)

Abstract

Performance was examined on three variants of the spontaneous object recognition (SOR) task, in 5-month old APPswe/PS1dE9 mice and wild-type littermate controls. A deficit was observed in an object-in-place (OIP) task, in which mice are preexposed to four different objects in specific locations, and then at test two of the objects swap locations (Experiment 2). Typically more exploration is seen of the objects which have switched location, which is taken as evidence of a retrieval-generated priming mechanism. However, no significant transgenic deficit was found in a relative recency (RR) task (Experiment 1), in which mice are exposed to two different objects in two separate sample phases, and then tested with both objects. Typically more exploration of the first presented object is observed, which is taken as evidence of a self-generated priming mechanism. Nor was there any impairment in the simplest variant, the spontaneous object recognition (SOR) task, in which mice are preexposed to one object and then tested with the familiar and a novel object. This was true regardless of whether the sample-test interval was 5 minutes (Experiment 1) or 24 hours (Experiments 1 and 2). It is argued that SOR performance depends on retrieval-generated priming as well as self-generated priming, and our preliminary evidence suggests that the retrieval-generated priming process is especially impaired in these young transgenic animals.

Item Type: Article
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham UK Campus > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Life Sciences > School of Biomedical Sciences
University of Nottingham UK Campus > Faculty of Science > School of Psychology
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2016.07.008
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 06 Jul 2016 14:05
Last Modified: 17 Sep 2016 08:25
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/34700

Actions (Archive Staff Only)

Edit View Edit View