Comparing individual and group intervention for psychological adjustment in people with multiple sclerosis: a feasibility randomised controlled trial

Das Nair, Roshan and Kontou, Eirini and Smale, Kathryn and Barker, Alex and Lincoln, Nadina (2015) Comparing individual and group intervention for psychological adjustment in people with multiple sclerosis: a feasibility randomised controlled trial. Clinical Rehabilitation . ISSN 1477-0873

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Abstract

Objective

To modify a published group intervention for adjustment to multiple sclerosis (MS) to suit an individual format, and to assess the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to compare individual and group intervention for people with multiple sclerosis and low mood.

Design

Feasibility randomised controlled trial.

Setting

Participants were recruited through healthcare professionals at a hospital-based multiple sclerosis service and the MS Society.

Subjects

People with multiple sclerosis.

Interventions

Adjustment to multiple sclerosis in individual or group delivery format.

Main measures

Participants completed mood and quality of life assessments at baseline and at four-month follow-up. Measures of feasibility included: recruitment rate, acceptability of randomisation and the intervention (content and format), and whether the intervention could be adapted for individual delivery. Participants were screened for inclusion using the General Health Questionnaire-12 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and were randomly allocated to receive either individual or group intervention, with the same content.

Results

Twenty-one participants were recruited (mean age 48.5 years, SD 10.5) and were randomly allocated to individual (n=11) or group (n=10) intervention. Of those offered individual treatment, nine (82%) completed all six sessions. Of those allocated to group intervention, two (20%) attended all six sessions and three (30%) attended five sessions. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups on the outcome measures of mood and quality of life.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Copyright 2015 Sage
Keywords: Multiple Sclerosis, Randomized controlled trial, Adjustment, Cognitive behavioural therapy
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham UK Campus > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Division of Rehabilitation and Ageing
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1177/0269215515616446
Depositing User: Dziunka, Patricia
Date Deposited: 15 Jun 2016 10:06
Last Modified: 17 Sep 2016 18:27
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/34031

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