Pre-surgery depression and confidence to manage problems predict recovery trajectories of health and wellbeing in the first two years following colorectal cancer: results from the CREW cohort study

Foster, Claire and Haviland, Joanne and Winter, Jane and Grimmett, Chloe and Chivers Seymour, Kim and Batehup, Lynn and Calman, Lynn and Corner, Jessica and Din, Amy and Fenlon, Deborah and May, Christine M. and Richardson, Alison and Smith, Peter W. and Souglakos, John (2016) Pre-surgery depression and confidence to manage problems predict recovery trajectories of health and wellbeing in the first two years following colorectal cancer: results from the CREW cohort study. PLOS ONE, 11 (5). e0155434. ISSN 1932-6203

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper identifies predictors of recovery trajectories of quality of life (QoL), health status and personal wellbeing in the two years following colorectal cancer surgery.

Methods

872 adults receiving curative intent surgery during November 2010 to March 2012. Questionnaires at baseline, 3, 9, 15, 24 months post-surgery assessed QoL, health status, wellbeing, confidence to manage illness-related problems (self-efficacy), social support, comorbidities, socio-demographic, clinical and treatment characteristics. Group-based trajectory analyses identified distinct trajectories and predictors for QoL, health status and wellbeing.

Results

Four recovery trajectories were identified for each outcome. Groups 1 and 2 fared consistently well (scores above/within normal range); 70.5%of participants for QoL, 33.3% health status, 77.6%wellbeing. Group 3 had some problems (24.2% QoL, 59.3% health, 18.2% wellbeing); Group 4 fared consistently poorly (5.3% QoL, 7.4% health, 4.2% wellbeing). Higher pre-surgery depression and lower self-efficacy were significantly associated with poorer trajectories for all three outcomes after adjusting for other important predictors including disease characteristics, stoma, anxiety and social support.

Conclusions

Psychosocial factors including self-efficacy and depression before surgery predict recovery trajectories in QoL, health status and wellbeing following colorectal cancer treatment independent of treatment or disease characteristics. This has significant implications for colorectal cancer management as appropriate support may be improved by early intervention resulting in more positive recovery experiences.

Item Type: Article
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham UK Campus > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Health Sciences
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0155434
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 14 Jun 2016 15:55
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2016 17:12
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/34010

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