Developing mHealth remote ronitoring rechnology for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a qualitative study eliciting user priorities and needs

Simons, Lucy and Valentine, Althea Z. and Falconer, Caroline J. and Groom, Madeleine and Daley, David and Craven, Michael P. and Young, Zoe and Hall, Charlotte and Hollis, Chris (2016) Developing mHealth remote ronitoring rechnology for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a qualitative study eliciting user priorities and needs. JMIR mHealth and uHealth, 4 (1). e31. ISSN 2291-5222

[img]
Preview
PDF - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Available under Licence Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (998kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Guidelines in the United Kingdom recommend that medication titration for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) should be completed within 4-6 weeks and include regular reviews. However, most clinicians think that weekly clinic contact is infeasible, and audits have shown that this timeline is rarely achieved. Thus, a more effective monitoring and review system is needed; remote monitoring technology (RMT) may be one way to improve current practice. However, little is known about whether patients with ADHD, their families, and clinicians would be interested in using RMT.

Objective: To explore patients’, parents’, and health care professionals’ views and attitudes toward using digital technology for remote monitoring during titration for ADHD.

Methods: This was a qualitative study, and data were collected through 11 focus groups with adults and young people with ADHD, parents of children with ADHD, and health care professionals (N=59).

Results: All participant groups were positive about using RMT in the treatment of ADHD, but they were also aware of barriers to its use, especially around access to technology and integrating RMT into clinical care. They identified that RMT had the most potential for use in the ongoing management and support of ADHD, rather than during the distinct titration period. Participants identified features of RMT that could improve the quality of consultations and support greater self-management.

Conclusions: RMT has the potential to augment support and care for ADHD, but it needs to go beyond the titration period and offer more to patients and families than monitoring through outcome measures. Developing and evaluating an mHealth app that incorporates the key features identified by end users is required.

Item Type: Article
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham UK Campus > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Division of Psychiatry
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.2196/mhealth.5009
Depositing User: Eprints, Support
Date Deposited: 24 Mar 2016 12:08
Last Modified: 13 Sep 2016 12:22
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/32509

Actions (Archive Staff Only)

Edit View Edit View