Expressive writing and posttraumatic growth: an Internet-based study

Stockton, Hannah and Joseph, Stephen and Hunt, Nigel (2014) Expressive writing and posttraumatic growth: an Internet-based study. Traumatology, 20 (2). pp. 75-83. ISSN 1085-9373

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Abstract

This study examined the effects of Internet-based expressive writing on posttraumatic growth. Expressive (n = 14) and control writing (n = 10) participants wrote for 15 min on 3 occasions spaced 3 days apart. Measures of intrusive and avoidant thoughts and posttraumatic growth were administered at baseline and 2- and 8-week postintervention follow-ups. Results showed that posttraumatic growth significantly increased from baseline to 8-week follow-up in the expressive writing group, while there was no significant change in levels of posttraumatic growth in the control group. Intrusive and avoidant cognitions did not differ between writing groups. Analyses of language use showed that greater use of insight words was associated with an increase in posttraumatic growth. Findings are consistent with cognitive processing models of expressive writing and have implications for Internet-administered expressive writing.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record.
Keywords: Posttraumatic Growth, Expressive Writing, Disclosure Writing, Internet-Based Research, LIWC
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham UK Campus > Faculty of Social Sciences > School of Sociology and Social Policy
University of Nottingham UK Campus > Faculty of Social Sciences > Institute of Work, Health and Organization
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1037/h0099377
Depositing User: Collier, Elanor
Date Deposited: 08 Mar 2016 10:38
Last Modified: 13 Sep 2016 14:53
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/32023

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