Acute intestinal obstruction secondary to left paraduodenal hernia: a case report and literature review

Al-Khyatt, Waleed and Aggarwal, Smeer and Birchall, James and Rowlands, Timothy E. (2013) Acute intestinal obstruction secondary to left paraduodenal hernia: a case report and literature review. World Journal of Emergency Surgery, 8 (5). 5/1-5/5. ISSN 1749-7922

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Abstract

Introduction: An internal hernia is a protrusion of bowel through a normal or abnormal orifice in the peritoneum

or mesentery. Although they are considered as a rare cause of intestinal obstruction, paraduodenal hernias are the

most common type of congenital hernias.

Methods: A literature search using PubMed was performed to identify all published cases of left paraduodenal

hernia (LPDH).

Results: In Literature search between 1980 and 2012 using PubMed revealed only 44 case reports before the

present one. Median age was 47 years (range 18 – 82 years). Nearly 50% reported previous mild symptoms.

Two-third of patients required emergency surgery in form of laparotomy or laparoscopic repair. Reduction of hernia

contents with widening or suture repair of the hernia orifice were the most common standards in surgical

management of LPDH.

Conclusion: Intestinal obstruction secondary to internal hernias is a rare presentation. High index of suspicion and

preoperative imaging are essential to make an early diagnosis in order to improve outcome.

Item Type: Article
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham UK Campus > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine > Division of Medical Sciences and Graduate Entry Medicine
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1186/1749-7922-8-5
Depositing User: de Sousa, Mrs Shona
Date Deposited: 11 Apr 2014 12:11
Last Modified: 13 Sep 2016 16:43
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/2944

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