Lability of Pb in soil: effects of soil properties and contaminant source

Mao, Lingchen and Bailey, Elizabeth H. and Chester, Jonathan and Dean, Joseph and Ander, E. Louise and Chenery, Simon R. and Young, Scott D. (2014) Lability of Pb in soil: effects of soil properties and contaminant source. Environmental Chemistry, 11 (6). pp. 690-701. ISSN 1448-2517

[img]
Preview
PDF - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Available under Licence Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (532kB) | Preview

Abstract

Environmental Context: There is growing concern that lead (Pb) in the environment may cause adverse health effects in human populations. We investigated the combined use of isotopic abundance and isotopic dilution to show how the origins of soil Pb and soil characteristics affect lability. Soil pH and soil Pb content are the dominant controls on Pb lability; the lability of recent petrol-derived Pb is similar to that of other sources in urban soils but greater than geogenic Pb in rural roadside topsoils.

Lability of lead (Pb) in soils is influenced by both soil properties and source(s) of contamination. We investigated factors controlling Pb lability in soils from (i) land adjacent to a major rural road, (ii) a sewage processing farm and (iii) an archive of the geochemical survey of London. We measured isotopically exchangeable Pb (E-values; PbE), phase fractionation of Pb by a sequential extraction procedure (SEP) and inferred source apportionment from measured Pb isotopic ratios. Isotopic ratios (206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb) of total soil Pb fell on a mixing line between those of petrol and UK coal or Pb ore. The main determinant of the isotopically exchangeable Pb fraction (%E-value) was soil pH: %E-values decreased with increasing pH. In rural roadside topsoils and there was also evidence that, petrol-derived Pb remained more labile (35%) than Pb from soil parent material (27%). However, in biosolid-amended and London soils %E-values were low (c. 25%), covered a restricted range, and showed no clear evidence of source-dependent lability.

Item Type: Article
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham UK Campus > Faculty of Science > School of Biosciences > Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1071/EN14100
Related URLs:
URLURL Type
UNSPECIFIEDPublisher
Depositing User: Bailey, Liz
Date Deposited: 06 Jul 2015 11:20
Last Modified: 14 Sep 2016 14:41
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/28777

Actions (Archive Staff Only)

Edit View Edit View