Evolution of β-blockers: from anti-anginal drugs to ligand-directed signalling

Baker, Jillian G. and Hill, Stephen J. and Summers, Roger J. (2011) Evolution of β-blockers: from anti-anginal drugs to ligand-directed signalling. Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, 32 (4). pp. 227-234. ISSN 0165-6147

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Sir James Black developed β-blockers, one of the most useful groups of drugs in use today. Not only are they being used for their original purpose to treat angina and cardiac arrhythmias, but they are also effective therapeutics for hypertension, cardiac failure, glaucoma, migraine and anxiety. Recent studies suggest that they might also prove useful in diseases as diverse as osteoporosis, cancer and malaria. They have also provided some of the most useful tools for pharmacological research that have underpinned the development of concepts such as receptor subtype selectivity, agonism and inverse agonism, and ligand-directed signalling bias. This article examines how β-blockers have evolved and indicates how they might be used in the future.

Item Type: Article
Schools/Departments: University of Nottingham UK Campus > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Life Sciences > School of Biomedical Sciences
Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tips.2011.02.010
Depositing User: Davies, Mrs Sarah
Date Deposited: 01 Apr 2014 10:49
Last Modified: 13 Sep 2016 17:11
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/2796

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