Exploring empowerment in conversation: delivering video interaction guidance to families of children who are deaf or hard of hearing

Collins, Luke C. (2013) Exploring empowerment in conversation: delivering video interaction guidance to families of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. PhD thesis, University of Nottingham.

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Abstract

Introduction: This work explored the concept of ‘empowerment’ in health care. A concept map of ‘empowerment’ was generated based on theories of linguistic analysis to locate aspects of empowerment in conversational data. The process of empowerment was understood within the theory of transformative learning as ‘perspective change’. A ten phase model of the transformative learning process was used to provide evidence of perspective transformation. The empowerment process was explored through the delivery of the intervention Video Interaction Guidance to 16 hearing families of pre-lingual deaf children.

Methods: The parents of the deaf children and the intervention guide engaged in conversations reviewing video clips of the parent and child in interaction. These conversations were processed through a corpus analysis software programme to discern key extracts of the participants’ conversational data. These extracts were to subject to discourse analysis to find evidence of transformative learning.

Analysis: Transformative learning was observed in 10 families. Transcript extracts representing the model of transformative learning were variable. Principles of conversation analysis were applied to explore the learning process in interaction. Participant speech was tagged to assess their level of engagement.

Outcomes: The corpus analysis-driven tagging process offers an original approach to representing the key content of large sets of interview data but in this work, was limited in showing how the interaction created opportunities for learning. Transformative learning processes were variable and the ten phase model could not be characterised in terms of discourse features alone. The intervention encouraged critical reflection but warrants directed focus to achieve learning. The participants were effective in acting as co-collaborators in the intervention process.

Discussion and concluding remarks: Models of empowerment must focus on the process, of the ways in which the guide and the participant create learning opportunities and evidence of this must be multimodal. Patient-centred interventions should be supported by an open, communicative relationship with the health service provider.

Item Type: Thesis (University of Nottingham only) (PhD)
Supervisors: James, D.
Carter, R.A.
Fortnum, H.
Subjects: W Medicine and related subjects (NLM Classification) > WV Otolaryngology
Faculties/Schools: UK Campuses > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Medicine
UK Campuses > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences > School of Clinical Sciences
Item ID: 13406
Depositing User: EP, Services
Date Deposited: 17 Oct 2013 11:26
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2016 01:42
URI: http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/id/eprint/13406

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